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I don't have any direct experience, but here are some thoughts. The turbo runs at very high speed, maybe more than 100,000 RPM. This is beyond the capability of ball or roller bearings, so it probably has some form of plain bearing (bush). It relies on being fed with high pressure oil, for hydrodynamic lubrication. There is a film of oil between the shaft and bush which prevents metal to metal contact. So the oil quality is critical. Also the whole bearing area needs to be kept cool to prevent damage, so there will be coolant pipes from the radiator circuit connected to the bearing housing somewhere. I hope this helps.
PS. If anyone has any better info I'd love to hear about it.
 

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White metal bearings that are oil fed. It is actually called a bearing. The oil thats fed to it created a small layer between the shaft and the bearing itself allowing it to rotate smoothly with no friction. This is why you must leave your engine running for a few minutes after arriving to your destination. Imagine how fast your turbo spins when you pull up. As soon as you switch off your engine, you switch off the oil feed to it meanong it spins dry until coming to a stand still causing damage to the bearings.
Word of advice to all turbo owners! Its not just allowing the engine to warm before lashing it. Its allowing it to stop properly too.
 

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And its not all white metal. Its is white metal sprayed/coated. Unsure of the actual material. Brass/copper maybes?
 

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Couple of minutes maybes? Depends how hard youve been driving and how hot you think it will be. Shouldn't take long for the turbo to slow down tbh though. Never looked deeply into it but Im guessing a minute tops
 

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The master techn at my dealers says that is rubbish, it is quite safe to switch off the ignition on stopping.
 

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The same technicians that told me the handbrake on the 208 cannot be adjusted?
Here's a quick example. Your driving along the motorway and your practically touching cloth after your 130mile drive. So you pull in, engine straight off and dash to the loo. Now when you have switched your engine off your turbo is still spinning. Pretty quickly. It can't just suddenly stop. Whereas the oil pump has stopped turning because you have stopped your engine. This means there is now no oil getting fed to the turbo. Yes there is oil going to be already there but that will only stay there for a few seconds. Engine is hot, oil is hot, so it will be thin and drain away. So now your turbo is spinning with no lubrication. This is when the damage occurs. Okay so it doesn't
it straight away but how many times do you use the car a week? Now figure out a year and how much damage will have occured by then.
 

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It doesn't take long for the turbo to stop spinning. Also most people are not "Full bore" into their driveway so I'm sure the last couple of miles were pretty gentle.

Also not confirmed but I'm sure that a modern car like the GTI has some form of oil circulation around the turbo bearing on shut down.
 
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